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Airway POCUS | ECPR vs. ACLS

JournalFeed

ECPR vs. ACLS Spoon Feed: Early extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR, aka ECMO) was not superior to standard advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) for 180-day survival with good neurological outcome, but there may be a silver lining.

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SGEM#238: The Epi Don’t Work for OHCA

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

This was a before and after study to see if advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) techniques, including IV epinephrine, would improve survival to discharge. This step is controversial, and we have covered it on the SGEM with the classic OPALS trial by Legend of Emergency Medicine Dr. Ian Stiell ( SGEM#64 ).

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Issue #3: The Latest in Critical Care, 6/5/23

PulmCCM

There was no significant difference in survival with a favorable neurologic outcome at 30 days (20% vs 16% nominally favoring the ECMO group, P=0.52) or at 6 months.

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ToxCard: Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity

EMDocs

Supportive care includes: protecting the airway if necessary, supplemental oxygen if needed, and vasopressor support if the patient is hypotensive. For patients who in cardiac arrest standard Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) should be initiated.

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SGEM#350: How Did I Get Epi Alone? Vasopressin and Methylprednisolone for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

You arrive and see that the Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) algorithm is being followed for adult cardiac arrest patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is in progress. The monitor shows a non-shockable rhythm.

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POCUS findings of hemodynamically unstable PE with cardiac arrest

EMDocs

Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) had been initiated and on arrival at the ED, the patient was found to have Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA). There was no other known medical history, and they found the patient recumbent in her desk chair pulseless, not breathing, with a fixed leftward gaze.