2021

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The Illusion of Eye Contact with Telemedicine

33 Charts

I’m big on eye contact with patients. It’s how we show ourselves as humans. The eyes are the windows to the soul. Through them, we build trust, empathy and reciprocity. When I’m with a patient face-to-face it isn’t always possible but I do my best. Like the IRL experience I try to achieve some level of eye contact during telemedicine encounters. But care through a screen presents challenges to eye contact.

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The Power of a COVID-19 Vaccine Sticker

PDC Healthcare

Driving Confidence and Compliance Similar to Flu Shot Stickers, using COVID-19 Vaccine Stickers can help healthcare facilities promote employee vaccinations while also encouraging patients to get vaccinated. The CDC published a full COVID-19 Vaccination Communication Toolkit, which includes sticker templates, to help build confidence about the COVID-19 vaccination among healthcare teams and other staff.

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How to Know if a Dog Is Dangerous to Your Child

Medical Law

Many of our friends and neighbors across the country took the time to adopt dogs this past year, and we applaud their commitment to taking care of our furry friends. Unfortunately, most new dog owners discovered the difficulties of training and socializing a pet during lockdown. Dogs, especially ones that were rehomed or rescues, may have a hard time behaving around strangers, loud noises, and in new areas.

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Advancements in Elastomeric Respirator Technology for Use as Source Control

NIOSH Science Blog

Respirator design is constantly improving and evolving to meet new challenges. Manufacturers have recently developed innovative NIOSH-approved elastomeric half mask respirator (EHMR) designs that both protect the wearer as well as provide adequate source control – protecting others by filtering the wearer’s exhaled air that may contain harmful viruses or bacteria.

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ECG Cases 21: Hyperacute T-waves and Occlusion MI

Emergency Medicine Cases

In this month's ECG Cases blog, Dr. Jesse MacLaren guides us through 10 cases of patients whose ECGs show tall T-waves and gives us the tools to distinguish the hyperacute T-waves of occlusion MI from other causes of tall T-waves. The post ECG Cases 21: Hyperacute T-waves and Occlusion MI appeared first on Emergency Medicine Cases.

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Surviving Sepsis 21 | BOUGIE RCT | Humor Med Ed | Rocket Science v Brain Surgery | Christmas Poem

JournalFeed

It’s the JournalFeed Podcast for the week of December 20-24, 2021. We cover Surviving Sepsis 2021, BOUGIE RCT, the role of humor in medical education, the age old question of rocket science vs brain surgery (who is smarter), and a Christmas reflection.

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SGEM#353: At the COCA, COCA for OCHA

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Date: December 21st, 2021 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Spencer Greaves is an Emergency Medicine resident at Florida Atlantic University. He received his Bachelors in Biomedical Engineering from Marquette University and his Masters in Public Health from Dartmouth College. Spencer completed his medical doctorate at the Medical College of Wisconsin. He and his wife live in Boynton Beach, FL […] The post SGEM#353: At the COCA, COCA for OCHA first appeared on The Skeptics Guide to Emergency Medicine.

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Hip Pain in Pediatrics

Northwestern EM Blog

Written by: Tommy Ng, MD (NUEM ‘24) Edited by: Patricia Bigach, MD (NUEM ‘22) Expert review by : Terese Whipple, MD '20 So your kid won’t walk One of the most common complaints in a pediatric Emergency Department is a child refusing or inability to ambulate. For normal development, a child is typically able to stand at 9 months, walk at 12 months, and run at 18 months.

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127. Parkour-ing into a C-spine injury

Board Bombs

Want to experience the greatest in board studying? Check out our interactive question bank podcast- the FIRST of its kind here: emrapidbombs.supercast.com This episode we are jumping into the Holiday Season and New Year with everything you need to know about C-spine injuries. We know this is a slightly longer episode than usual for us at EMBB, but we think this one is a New Year’s Special.

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A Sage Moment

Dr. No

It’s not often that Dr No’s flabber gets well and truly ghasted. An extraordinary exchange on twitter (scroll down a page or so to get to the start of the substance, and click here to see the above tweet) has revealed what many have long suspected: SAGE purposely cook the books in its modelling reports. Graham Medley , professor of infectious disease modelling at LSHTM, and chief pongo for the time being of SAGE’s modelling group SPI-M, defends the group’s practice of 

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Why DotMD Sold Out in Two Days

33 Charts

This past weekend the storied medical meeting DotMD sold out in two days. How did this happen and what does DotMD deliver that no other meeting does? Experiences. People are desperate for experiences. And the future of meetings is about the creation of human experiences. Sound, sensory, and emotion. These define DotMD. Like minds. Beyond the power of the programming and a remarkable culture, DotMD draws the most fascinating people in healthcare.

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5 Easy Ways to Promote Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Your Healthcare Organization

PDC Healthcare

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, an important time to bring attention to a disease that 1 in 8 women have a chance to develop. Raising awareness helps educate women on the warning signs and symptoms of breast cancer, promotes regular cancer screening, and raises funding for research to help save lives. From identification and […]. The post 5 Easy Ways to Promote Breast Cancer Awareness Month in Your Healthcare Organization appeared first on connectID - PDC Healthcare Blog.

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New California Ballot Initiative in 2022 Adjusts Limitations in Medical Negligence Cases

Medical Law

Medical professionals can be held liable in medical malpractice lawsuits for injuries they cause their patients through negligence. In 1975 California set a cap of $250,000 for medical malpractice noneconomic damages. These types of damages include pain and suffering, mental anguish, emotional trauma, scarring and disfigurement, and diminished quality of life.

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Suicide Prevention for Healthcare Workers

NIOSH Science Blog

Some occupations are known to have higher rates of suicide than others (see related blogs). Job factors – such as low job security, low pay, and job stress – can contribute to risk of suicide, as can easy access to lethal means among people at risk—such as medications or firearms. Other factors that can influence the link between occupation and suicide include gender, socioeconomic status, the economy, cultural factors, and stigma.

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Pathways to Emergency Medicine: What to Know Early in the Career Exploration Process

Downeast Emergency Medicine

Emergency medicine (EM) was first recognized as a specialty by the American Medical Association (AMA) in 1972. Since that time, EM residencies have grown and evolved to provide academic support and training for graduating medical students interested in pursuing a career in the field. Since its early days of small and scattered residency programs, EM has burgeoned to nearly 3,000 residency positions according to the 2021 Report on Residents published by the Association of American Medical College

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ETCO2 Trauma | ORIF v Cast Radius | CAP-IT RCT | Ped CAP Severity Tool | COVID, Stress & You

JournalFeed

It’s the JournalFeed Podcast for the week of December 13-17, 2021. We cover ETCO2 and trauma outcomes, ORIF vs cast for adult distal radius fractures, high or low/ 3 or 7 day treatment for pediatric community acquired pneumonia, a new pediatric CAP severity prediction tool, and how emergency physicians are coping with COVID stress.

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SGEM Xtra: Star Trek Made Me A Better Physician

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Date: July 24th, 2021 Guest Skeptic: Dr. Brain Goldman is an Emergency Medicine physician who works at Mount Sinai hospital in Toronto. He is the host of CBC radio show White Coat Black Art and the podcast The Dose. He is also the author of the bestselling books The Night Shift, Secret language of Doctors, and the Power of […] The post SGEM Xtra: Star Trek Made Me A Better Physician first appeared on The Skeptics Guide to Emergency Medicine.

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Ultrasound Tweetorials!

Critical Care North Hampton

I’ve been delivering Tweetorials on various aspects of ultrasound over the year. So, here’s a festive Tweet (sad!), for you. All in one post! Enjoy and happy scanning… look after yourselves. Jump links: Heart Lung Diaphragm Liver Gastric Aorta DVT Airway JW HEART 1/13 Today’s Tweetorial for you! We look at basic cardiac #POCUS views?

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Ep 163 Acute Heart Failure ED Management – PoCUS, Oxygenation Strategies, Medication Strategies, PPV HAVoC and SCAPE

Emergency Medicine Cases

In this Part 1 of our two-part series on acute heart failure, Anton is joined by Dr. Tarlan Hedayati and Dr. Bourke Tillman to answer such questions as: how does PoCUS compare with clinical assessment and CXR in diagnostic accuracy for acute heart failure? How do we best integrate PoCUS in the our assessment and management of the patient with acute heart failure?

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126. Hypothermia: can we please just use Celsius?

Board Bombs

Want to experience the greatest in board studying? Check out our interactive question bank podcast- the FIRST of its kind here: emrapidbombs.supercast.com Why does America still use Fahrenheit? We don’t know, and we are starting to get upset.Let’s review some hypothermia pearls, from ACEP’s PEERCert Q bank! Want to experience the greatest in board studying?

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New Ways of Legislating

Dr. No

Covid — the perfect public health emergency that just keeps on giving. Each new scariant is only ever one step away from the next new scariant — an endless flow of new worries, Fergie forecasts and government responses, forever clogging up the mainstream media, like logs in a log jam. Behind the puppetry, for an authoritarian government hell bent on passing draconian laws and regulations with the minimum of scrutiny, covid is the perfect enabling epidemic, because it allows the government to get

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What is a Doctor’s Role?

33 Charts

This sounds like a crazy question. But it really isn’t. What does a doctor do? What’s my job with my patients. What is a doctor’s role? Some of what I do is transactional. Simple stuff with clear end-points. Some of it involves critical conversations and deeper kinds of thinking, planning, and translating. Breaking my job down into different roles I got to thinking about what I do on a daily basis.

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75: Pulmonary Embolism and ECPR

ED ECMO

In this short episode, Zack makes two points. One, it was tough to get to where we are with ECMO acceptance. Two, cardiac arrest patients in PEA should be considered for ECPR. Below is the full editorial Zack and Alice did recently in the Journal of Resuscitation on the topic. It was born out of a fantastic German article centered looking at registry outcomes for PE and ECMO.

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How Radars Enforce Speed Limits

Medical Law

While enjoying the scenic highways that run through California, you may have noticed traffic signs that read, “Speed Limit Enforced by Radar,” or even some signs that say, “Speed Limit Enforced by Aircraft.” Neither sign gives much description as to how the process works, however, and may leave you wondering how your speed is actually monitored. Here’s a snapshot of how it works: Radar-Enforced Speed Limits.

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Episode 64 – Thoracic Aortic Syndromes- An Interview with Dr. Anthony Hackett

EB Medicine

EMplify – December 2021 Announcements: The EB Medicine app is live and available for free in the Apple Store. Coming to Google Play soon. It is in Beta and your feedback is welcome. , This month get a $50 Amazon Gift Card with all orders over $300 at [link] Check out the newly redesigned FOAMed blog at [link] Thoracic Aortic Syndromes in The Emergency Department: Recognition and Management Interview with author: Anthony Hackett, MD Thoracic Aortic Syndromes Dissection, Intramural Hematoma, and P

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Ultrasound of the Month - Not all veggies are good for your health

Downeast Emergency Medicine

Case presentation A 37-year-old female with a history of mild intermittent asthma, hepatitis C, and opioid abuse disorder (in remission for the past year being maintained on buprenorphine) presents to the emergency department after being called due to positive blood cultures. She was seen at urgent care the day prior for a worsening progressive cough, shortness of breath, and pleuritic right anterolateral chest pain.

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Patient-Centered Dx | tPA Pre-Endovascular | Steroids RPA | LP Febrile Seizure | AHA Chest Pain

JournalFeed

It’s the JournalFeed Podcast for the week of December 6-10, 2021. We cover patient-centered diagnostic excellence, alteplase before endovascular stroke treatment, steroids for pediatric retropharyngeal abscess, LP for febrile seizure, and the new AHA chest pain guideline.

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The Return of The Hospitalist & The Resuscitationist: Face2Face (masked faces!) for 2022!

Thinking Critical Care

So after much deliberation, we have decided and are excited to bring the fourth edition of H&R back for 2022 – we had skipped 2021 to focus on some research papers and developing some courses (Flipping the Vent and The VExUS Course), but mostly because the virtual conferencing experience simply did not measure up to the live event. What makes boutique conferences like H&R so different (and awesome) is the similar mind-set of the faculty and the participants, the opportunity to inte

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Battle of the Portables – Kosmos!

Critical Care North Hampton

Here is another in our review series, and one with the most reviews we’ve ever had! 6 clinicians rate the device. There are 2 detailed reviews from myself and then the fantastic Philipe Rola (he of VExUS fame and top Ultrascoundrel). We then get overall thoughts from us all (Myself, Philipe Rola, Segun Olusanya, Adrian.

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EM Quick Hits 34 Carr’s Case, Septic Arthritis vs Transient Synovitis, Managing Tracheostomies, Ethylene Glycol Poisoning, Ketamine for Agitation

Emergency Medicine Cases

In this months EM Quick Hits podcast: The mighty return of Carr's Cases! Sarah Reid on differentiating septic arthritis from transient synovitis in pediatric limp, Anand Swaminathan on managing tracheostomy complications in the ED, Nour Khatib on rural medicine and ethylene glycol poisoning, Justin Morgenstern on RCTs for ketamine in patients with severe agitation.

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HIPAA

Total Medical ComplianceHIPAA

DISCLOSING COVID-19 VACCINATION STATUS. HHS has published an article on the HIPAA Privacy Rule’s effect on the disclosure of COVID-19 vaccination status for healthcare. The following are excerpts from the article. For the full text see: [link]. Remember that HIPAA is not the only set of laws that regulate this information. Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule prohibit businesses or individuals from asking whether their customers or clients have received a COVID-19 vaccine?

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Bonfire of the Straw Masks

Dr. No

There have been some crackles in recent days on twitter, as the Bangladeshi mask trial caught light again. The crackling started with the publication of a ‘ short note ‘ that provided a ‘simple analysis’ of the recently released raw data from the Bangladeshi trial that claimed that, given the new ‘simple analysis’, the trial failed to show any covid protection benefit from mask wearing.

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Goodhart’s law and patient satisfaction

33 Charts

Goodhart’s law suggests that when a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure. When I first read this I couldn’t help but think of healthcare and the quest for the perfect patient satisfaction score. The problem is that as soon as we steer physician behavior and teach to the test , patient satisfaction scores stop being a valid measure.

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7 Tips for a Safe and Healthful Holiday Season

Advanced Medical Reviews

It seems like just yesterday summer was on the scene, bringing warm weather, family vacations and an array of outdoor sporting activities. However, winter will be here soon, with the season starting in the Northern Hemisphere on December 21.

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Brain Injuries Could Have Subtle Symptoms

Medical Law

Trauma to the head is common in motor vehicle, bicycle accidents, and falls. A person may suffer injury to the brain that goes undetected by medical professionals, with symptoms that begin to appear during the first 72 hours after the injury. This condition, known as subtle brain injury (SBI), can have life-altering consequences for victims and their families.

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The exFAST

Ultrasound Gel

The FAST exam has been used in trauma for decades - so why is there still confusion on how to use it in pediatrics? Because kids are different than adults! This article takes a look at the associations between intraabdominal injury and the FAST, physical exam, and labs. The authors then combine the FAST with physical exam findings to create the exFAST, the FAST-enhanced physical exam!

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Journal Club - Emergency Department Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder

Downeast Emergency Medicine

Background Recent data from the National Center for Health Statistics reveal that in the 12-month period ending in April 2021, more than 100,000 Americans died of an overdose, a staggering increase of nearly 30% the prior year. While the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to overdose deaths and taxed constrained Emergency Department (ED) resources, it has also clarified the important role that emergency physicians have in expanding access to life-saving medications to treat opioid use dis