2024

article thumbnail

ECG Blog #415 — The Cath showed NO Occlusion!

Ken Grauer, MD

Today’s patient is an older woman who experienced a number of fainting epiodes over the previous week. No CP ( C hest P ain ). Shortly after arrival in the ED ( E mergency D epartment ) — she suffered a cardiac arrest. The ECG in Figure-1 was obtained following successful resuscitation. Stat Echo — obtained shortly after successful resuscitation revealed anterior wall akinesis.

EKG/ECG 373
article thumbnail

Best Of EAST 2024 #8: Whole Blood And VTE

The Trauma Pro

The pendulum has swung from the use of whole blood in the early 20th century, to component therapy in the 1960s, and now a gradual move toward incorporating whole blood again. More and more papers are being published, and many trauma centers are looking for ways to integrate whole blood into their massive transfusion protocols. Much of the literature has been dedicated to safety and effectiveness, but little has examined thrombotic complications from its use.

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Trending Sources

article thumbnail

The Patient

Sensible Medicine

You can only listen to, or read, what doctors have to say for so long. Today, in our Friday, “reflective writing” slot, an essay from someone in the bed rather than beside it. Adam Cifu Sensible Medicine is a reader-supported publication. If you appreciate our work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. After ten days tethered to an IV of cyclosporine, the surgeon explained that he would remove my colon, create a stoma, and hitch a colostomy bag to my abdomen.

Hospitals 141
article thumbnail

COVID-19 antivax quacks are now “repurposing” ivermectin for cancer

Science Based Medicine

A year ago, I noticed that COVID-19 quacks were touting the "repurposing" of ivermectin to treat cancer. Now, familiar COVID-19 antivaxxers—cough, cough, FLCCC—have turbocharged this quackery. The post COVID-19 antivax quacks are now “repurposing” ivermectin for cancer first appeared on Science-Based Medicine.

142
142
article thumbnail

Mechanical Ventilation Basics

EM Ottawa

Mechanical ventilation has a lot of nuance associated with it, but a lot of reference guides focus on care in the ICU. There is certainly a need for more practical application for the ED doc or initial setup of patients on the vent. With both ER and ICU experience, this post acts as a quick […] The post Mechanical Ventilation Basics appeared first on EMOttawa Blog.

EMS 141
article thumbnail

Cardiopulmonary Point of Care Ultrasound – Book Review

Critical Care North Hampton

Many thanks to Dr Manoj Wickramsinghe for his review of this fabulous POCUS textbook. He is a trainee in Anaesthesia and ICM, based in Leeds, and one of the CCN editorial team. About the book authors Editors; Hatem Soliman-Aboumarie, Marcelo Haertel Miglioranza, Luna Gargani, Giovanni Volpicelli. The authors and editors of this book include some.

More Trending

article thumbnail

Paxlovid evidence: still very little reason to prescribe

First 10 EM

We are once again buried in a wave of viral respiratory illnesses, and much of the burden of illness is still COVID. I did a pretty thorough review of all COVID antiviral therapies in 2022, both on First10EM and on the EMCases Journal Jam, but that was 2 years ago. I think most of us […] The post Paxlovid evidence: still very little reason to prescribe appeared first on First10EM.

129
129
article thumbnail

Real-World Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

Life in the Fast Lane

Sheralyn Guilleminot and Mike Cadogan Real-World Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Interview with critical care clinician, and AI enthusiast, Dr Sameer Shaikh on the many ways to use AI to save time and increase efficiency in healthcare

126
126
article thumbnail

Top resus papers for TBS. St Emlyn’s

St. Emlyn

St.Emlyn's - Emergency Medicine #FOAMed This week I am in Zermatt, Switzerland for ‘The Big Sick’ conference. This is something I have been looking forward to years, but major heart surgery (valves not pipes) and […] The post Top resus papers for TBS. St Emlyn’s appeared first on St.Emlyn's.

121
121
article thumbnail

PulmCrit hot take: VAP prophylaxis (PROPHY-VAP trial)

EMCrit

background: ANTHARTIC trial Prophylaxis against VAP (ventilator associated pneumonia) has is already supported by a few studies in the literature, perhaps most notably the ANTHARTIC trial. That was a multi-center RCT evaluating 48 hours of therapy with ampicillin-sulbactam for patients intubated following cardiac arrest. Antibiotic therapy reduced early-onset VAP, with a trend towards more ventilator-free […] EMCrit Project by Josh Farkas.

124
124
article thumbnail

Cannabidiol in refractory status epilepticus

Don't Forget the Bubbles

A UK-based study found that 4% of admissions to a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) over a 10-year period were due to refractory status epilepticus (RSE) – seizures which fail to terminate despite appropriate first and second-line treatments. Of those patients admitted with RSE, a subset will go on to develop super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE).

Seizures 122
article thumbnail

Trauma Activation Vs. Stroke Code

The Trauma Pro

Let’s look at an uncommon scenario that crops up from time to time. Most seasoned trauma professionals have seen this one a time or two: An elderly male is driving on a sunny afternoon, and crashes his car into a highway divider at 25 miles per hour. EMS responds and notes that he has a few facial lacerations, is awake but confused. They note some possible facial asymmetry and perhaps a bit of upper extremity weakness.

article thumbnail

Not the Way to Pull Vaccines Back from a “Dangerous Tipping Point”

Sensible Medicine

Peter Marks, the director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research at the FDA, and Robert Califf, the commissioner of the FDA published a “Viewpoint” article in JAMA on January 5th: Is Vaccination Approaching a Dangerous Tipping Point. The Viewpoint is short and certainly worth a read – probably before getting further in this essay.

Research 132
article thumbnail

The Menace of Wellness Influencers

Science Based Medicine

Wellness influencers are often also conspiracy theorists, as both mindsets rely upon the same underlying methods, motivation, and narrative. The post The Menace of Wellness Influencers first appeared on Science-Based Medicine.

Wellness 141
article thumbnail

Coronary Artery Calcium Scans Are Not the Answer

Stop and Think

Since Andrew Foy and I wrote our Case Against Coronary Artery Scans in an academic journal, the test has only increased in popularity. Grin. The imaging test measures the amount of calcium in the coronary arteries. It’s not covered by health insurers, but smart businesspeople have placed the cost at a manageable $100—which is only a fraction of what you’d be billed for a medical grade CT scan.

Academics 123
article thumbnail

The AcT Trial: Tenecteplase vs Alteplase for Acute Ischemic Stroke

RebelEM

Background : Alteplase, a class of medication that converts plasminogen to plasmin leading to fibrin degradation and subsequent clot lysis, has been the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients that meet eligibility criteria. Tenecteplase, a modified version of alteplase, is being increasingly utilized for AIS due to its favorable pharmacological profile, ease of administration, and cost effectiveness.

Stroke 118
article thumbnail

What is this ECG finding? Do you understand it before you hear the clinical context?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Pendell Meyers First try to interpret this ECG with no clinical context: The ECG shows an irregularly irregular rhythm, therefore almost certainly atrial fibrillation. After an initially narrow QRS, there is a very large abnormal extra wave at the end of the QRS complex. These are Osborn waves usually associated with hypothermia. There is also large T wave inversion and long QT.

article thumbnail

SGEM#430: De Do Do Do, De Dash, Dash DAShED – Diagnosing Acute Aortic Syndrome in the ED.

The Skeptics' Guide to EM

Reference: McLatchie et al and DAShED investigators. Diagnosis of Acute Aortic Syndrome in the Emergency Department (DAShED) study: an observational cohort study of people attending the emergency department with symptoms consistent with acute aortic syndrome. EMJ Nov 2023. Date: February 11, 2024 Guest Skeptic: Nirdosh Ashok Kumar, Emergency Medicine Specialist – Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. […] The post SGEM#430: De Do Do Do, De Dash, Dash DAShED – Diagnosing Acute Aortic Sy

article thumbnail

AI-Assisted Learning and Teaching

Life in the Fast Lane

Sheralyn Guilleminot and Mike Cadogan AI-Assisted Learning and Teaching AI-assisted learning and teaching is an often-overlooked use of artificial intelligence in medicine! Here are 4 ways to do it.

116
116
article thumbnail

ECG Cases 48 – ECG Interpretation in Cardiac Arrest

Emergency Medicine Cases

In this month's ECG Cases blog Dr. Jesse McLaren reviews interpretation of the pre-arrest ECG: identifying high risk ECGs requiring empiric treatment like calcium for hyperkalemia, magnesium for long QT, or reperfusion for Occlusion MI; the intra-arrest ECG: identifying pseudo-PEA; and post-arrest ECG: the importance of serial ECGs to reduce false positive STEMI, role of POCUS to help with the differential of diffuse ST depression with reciprocal ST elevation in aVR, and identifying signs of Occ

EKG/ECG 112
article thumbnail

PulmCrit – Validation of my model for converting VBGs to ABGs

EMCrit

background and general concept My research project in fellowship was the construction of a mathematical model to convert VBG values into ABG values. The fundamental concept for the model was pretty simple: we can approximate the respiratory quotient (RQ) of tissue in the hand as being constant. This indicates that changes in oxygen content and […] EMCrit Project by Josh Farkas.

Research 121
article thumbnail

AJPH Highlights Health Worker Mental Health

NIOSH Science Blog

The American Journal of Public Health recently published a special supplement with 15 articles focusing on health worker mental health. This special issue of the journal was sponsored and edited by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and stems from the health worker mental health initiative from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and NIOSH.

Research 109
article thumbnail

Use Of A Solid Organ Injury Protocol For Pediatrics

The Trauma Pro

Kids are frequent flyers when it comes to abdominal injury, with about 15% of their injuries involving this anatomic area. Solid organ injuries, mainly the liver and spleen, are the most prevalent ones. The American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) published a practice guideline way back in 2000 that outlined a consistent way to care for children with solid organ injuries.

article thumbnail

The Study of the Week Is a Beautiful Example of Science Done Well

Sensible Medicine

Academic medicine sometimes gets it right. This is a positive story about a negative trial. Neurologist Hooman Kamel from the Weil Cornell Medical Center in NY had an idea about atrial fibrillation and stroke. Old thinking held that clots formed in the left atrium during periods of irregular rapid fibrillatory activity. Stroke came when these clots moved northward to the brain.

Wellness 123
article thumbnail

The Wellness Company: How antivaccine grift becomes plain old quackery

Science Based Medicine

The Wellness Company, promoted by Dr. Peter McCullough, is the product of a trend in which antivax doctors have predictably become just quacks. At least in this case, there is an amusing quack fight at the heart of it all. The post The Wellness Company: How antivaccine grift becomes plain old quackery first appeared on Science-Based Medicine.

Wellness 144
article thumbnail

The Latest in Critical Care, 1/29/24 (Issue #27)

PulmCCM

AHA Updates its Cardiac Arrest Guidelines In December 2023, the American Heart Association published a “focused update” to its landmark guidelines for the management of cardiac arrest. PulmCCM is not affiliated with the American Heart Association. Read the document for all the details (it’s not long). Here’s PulmCCM’s take on the new changes.

CPR 115
article thumbnail

Pre-Hospital Antibiotics in Sepsis?

RebelEM

Background: Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. It is well-established that earlier recognition and treatment can lead to better outcome for these patients . Time to antibiotic therapy (from triage, not from onset of infection) has become a quality metric to improve the time to administration of these medications. In an effort to administer antibiotics earlier, many studies have attempted to give antibiotics in the prehospital setting but the benefit of this int

Sepsis 119
article thumbnail

A young man with persistent palpitations

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

Written by Pendell Meyers A teenager was playing basketball when he suddenly developed palpitations and lightheadedness. He presented soon afterward at the Emergency Department with ongoing symptoms. Mentation and blood pressure were normal. He had no chest pain or shortness of breath. Heart rates on the monitor fluctuated from 180-250 bpm. Here is his triage ECG: What do you think?

EKG/ECG 111
article thumbnail

Best Practices for Healthcare Organizations to Ensure OSHA Compliance

American Medical Compliance

Ensuring the safety and well-being of both patients and staff is paramount. With the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) setting standards to protect workers from occupational hazards, healthcare organizations face unique challenges in maintaining compliance due to the complexity of their operations and the diverse array of risks inherent in patient care.

article thumbnail

Right Ventricular Heart Failure

EB Medicine

In this episode, Sam Ashoo, MD, and T.R. Eckler MD interview Nick Harrison, MD and Daniel Brenner, MD, two of the authors of the February 2024 Emergency Medicine Practice article, Emergency Department Management of Patients With Right Heart Failure Pathophysiology Presenting Symptoms Differential Diagnosis Specific Acute Causes PE Sepsis RVMI PPV ARDS COVID-19 Specific Chronic Causes CTEPH Left Heart Failure Congenital Heart Disease LVAD Lung Disease Group 3 Pulmonary Hypertension Pulmonary A

article thumbnail

ACEP says its OK to use topical anesthetics for simple corneal abrasions

First 10 EM

Long time readers will know that I generally dislike guidelines. Although there are exceptions, I think that guidelines are often more problematic than helpful. However, I know that many people work in places that have medicolegal structures that leave them feeling completely paralyzed, and unable to practice in the absence of a relevant guideline. The […] The post ACEP says its OK to use topical anesthetics for simple corneal abrasions appeared first on First10EM.

108
108