Trending Articles

article thumbnail

Artificial Platelets Under Development!

The Trauma Pro

Uncontrolled bleeding is the bane of trauma professionals everywhere. Early in a resuscitation, we focus on identifying potential sources. We’ve developed numerous techniques for plugging them up. And we have processes in place to replace the blood that’s been lost. Unfortunately, blood products are a perishable item. Packed red blood cells have a typical shelf-life of 42 days.

article thumbnail

An EPiC mental model. St Emlyn’s

St. Emlyn

St.Emlyn's - Emergency Medicine #FOAMed The practice of coordinating, consulting and managing an entire acute clinical service in real-time is fairly unique to emergency medicine. Central to this is the EPiC (or emergency physician in charge) role #FOAMed @stemlyns with @codingbrown The post An EPiC mental model. St Emlyn’s appeared first on St.Emlyn's.

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Trending Sources

article thumbnail

Pro-Infection Doctors Didn’t Just Want Kids in School. They Wanted Them There Unvaccinated, Untested, and Unmasked. They Wanted Them Infected.

Science Based Medicine

The virus massively disrupted schools around the world, and those of us who did nothing more than acknowledge this obvious reality were absurdly blamed for it. The post Pro-Infection Doctors Didn’t Just Want Kids in School. They Wanted Them There Unvaccinated, Untested, and Unmasked. They Wanted Them Infected. first appeared on Science-Based Medicine.

124
124
article thumbnail

Friday Reflection #39: What to Expect When You Are Aging

Sensible Medicine

MM is 94 years old. Her only active medical issues are hypertension and vitamin D deficiency. She takes only 20 mg of lisinopril and 1000 units of vitamin D3 each day. She has no cognitive decline and gardens every day if the Chicago weather allows. Her Friday afternoon appointment is the doctor’s last of the week. Sensible Medicine is a reader-supported publication.

Hospitals 113
article thumbnail

PulmCrit: Why the new study associating piptazo with increased mortality is wrong

EMCrit

Piperacillin-tazobactam is an antibiotic that a lot of people love to hate. Combine this with the conservatism that often (rightfully) surrounds drug safety, and it creates a lot of volatility. Before going further, we should review some recent history regarding piptazo. In the early 2010's, a series of retrospective correlational studies found that patients treated […] EMCrit Project by Josh Farkas.

108
108
article thumbnail

The “Backward Finochietto” Problem

The Trauma Pro

Resuscitative thoracotomy is a (sometimes) life-saving procedure reserved for trauma patients in extremis. Thankfully, most trauma centers do very few of these a year. However, that makes it one of those “high severity – low frequency” procedures that generate many, many quality improvement problems. Many of these issues are due to operator unfamiliarity or equipment availability.

article thumbnail

Action Is The Antidote For Rumination - An Interview with Rob Orman, MD

EB Medicine

In this episode, Sam Ashoo, MD interviews Rob Orman, MD, founder of Orman Physician Coaching , about routine examination of our careers in emergency medicine. Understanding Career Cycles and Embracing Change The Importance of Career Reflection and Making Trades Navigating Career Satisfaction and Preventing Burnout Proactive Career Management and Reflection Strategies Exploring Career Alternatives and Rediscovering Joy in Medicine Balancing Work, Love, Play, and Health for a Satisfying Life When

91

More Trending

article thumbnail

Medical Student Accommodations

Sensible Medicine

Recently, I learned about a student on their clinical rotations who had to be sent home at precisely 9 hours. No matter how busy the day or service, the student would leave at the 9 hour mark. The reason? The student had a disability accommodation because he suffered from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Subscribe now In medicine there is a tension.

article thumbnail

JC – Chat GPT and AI vs Humans in medical assessment – is there a difference?

St. Emlyn

St.Emlyn's - Emergency Medicine #FOAMed Can ChatGPT write clinical cases and MCQs unrecognisable from those written by humans? The post JC – Chat GPT and AI vs Humans in medical assessment – is there a difference? appeared first on St.Emlyn's.

92
article thumbnail

New Biomarkers in Blood for Early Cancer Diagnosis

Emergency Live

Discovery of 618 Cancer-Associated Proteins for 19 Types of Cancer Thanks to two studies led by the University of Oxford and published in Nature Communications, a total of 618 proteins in the blood have been identified that may indicate the presence of 19 different types of tumors. Among these, 107 could reveal the risk of […] The post New Biomarkers in Blood for Early Cancer Diagnosis appeared first on Emergency Live.

85
article thumbnail

An undergraduate who is an EKG tech sees something. The computer calls it completely normal. How about the physicians?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

This was sent by an undergraduate (not yet in medical school, but applying now) who works as an ED technician (records all EKGs, helps with procedures, takes vital signs) and who reads this blog regularly. Edited by Smith He also sent me this great case. A 63 year old man with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, prediabetes, and a family history of CAD developed chest pain, shortness of breath, and diaphoresis after consuming a large meal at noon.

EKG/ECG 61
article thumbnail

FitScript™: Functional health quackery and a misleading alternative cancer cure testimonial

Science Based Medicine

Perusing the hellscape that is what Twitter has degenerated into as X, I found an alternative cancer cure testimonial, which led me into "functional health" nonsense that I hadn't encountered before. Introducing FitScript. The post FitScript™: Functional health quackery and a misleading alternative cancer cure testimonial first appeared on Science-Based Medicine.

60
article thumbnail

When a Medicine Works but Overall Benefit is Minimal to None

Sensible Medicine

The story of reversal agents for anticoagulants exposes many of the complexities of treating human beings. I like the story and I think you will too. Some background, then to the ANNEXA-I study. The new anticoagulants are called direct acting oral anticoagulants or DOACs. Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) and apixaban (Eliquis) are the two most popular. These drugs surpassed the old one, warfarin, because of convenience, efficacy and safety.

Stroke 76
article thumbnail

Cardiac Arrest – the 5 C’s

Life in the Fast Lane

Kane Guthrie Cardiac Arrest – the 5 C’s Cardiac Arrest - the 5 C's with Cliff Reid. Causes Of Cardiac Arrest You NEVER Thought Of?! Meet The Hs & Ts & Cs!

article thumbnail

Exploring the Different Shapes of Ambulances

Emergency Live

A World of Variety for Every Emergency Ambulances, vital vehicles for emergency medical transport, come in a wide array of shapes and sizes, designed to meet the diverse needs of both patients and emergencies. From standard ambulances to highly specialized units, the variety of these vehicles is astounding. Here’s an overview of the main types […] The post Exploring the Different Shapes of Ambulances appeared first on Emergency Live.

84
article thumbnail

Senior Account Manager's Insights: A Decade in Healthcare Recruitment with Josh

Core Medical Group

Josh, a seasoned professional with over a decade of experience in healthcare recruitment at CoreMedical Group, brings a wealth of expertise to his role. Starting in sourcing and advancing to perm recruiting, he has excelled as a recruiter, team leader, and now as a Senior Account Manager. Known for his strong relationships and continuous improvement mindset, Josh is dedicated to making a positive impact by connecting healthcare professionals with their dream opportunities.

77
article thumbnail

Time to trash proximal tibia and 15 mm IO needle in adult & paediatric cardiac arrest!

MEDEST118

References: Kwong S, Kothary S, Poncinelli LL. Skeletal development of the proximal humerus in the pediatric population: MRI features. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Feb;202(2):418-25. doi: 10.2214/AJR.13.10711. PMID: 24450686. Reid C, Fogg T, Healy G. Deformation of a humeral intraosseous catheter due to positioning for thoracostomy. Clin Exp Emerg Med. 2018 Sep;5(3):208-209. doi: 10.15441/ceem.17.243.

article thumbnail

Rosh Review My EMCert Monthly Question

RebelEM

A 67-year-old woman with a history of atrial fibrillation on apixaban presents to the ED for epistaxis that began 30 minutes ago. Her bleeding is difficult to control with direct nasal pressure and topical agents but resolves with silver nitrate cauterization. Her vital signs are within normal limits. How should this patient’s apixaban be managed? Administer a one-time dose of intravenous vitamin K Administer andexanet alfa Bolus 1 unit of prothrombin complex concentrate Give intravenous tranexa

EMS 56
article thumbnail

emDOCs Podcast – Episode 100: Acute Chest Syndrome Part 1

EMDocs

Today on the emDOCs cast with Brit Long, MD ( @long_brit) , we cover acute chest syndrome part 1. Episode 100: Acute Chest Syndrome Part 1 Background SCD is an autosomal recessive condition that results in the formation of hemoglobin S (HbS). HbS has reduced solubility in the setting of hypoxia, leading to sickling of the RBCs. Other causes of sickling: acidosis, dehydration, inflammation, infection, fever, and blood stasis Sickling leads to vascular occlusion, end-organ ischemia, and decreased

article thumbnail

Improving the qualities of ventilations during CPR

Emergency Live

The ventilation maneuver during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a complex intervention influenced by various factors related to the patient, the operator, and the environment. Therefore, researchers have highlighted the importance of objectively and reliably measuring the quality of ventilation during CPR through a scientific study The objective of the study, conducted by Dr.

CPR 83
article thumbnail

Dermatology in Skin of Colour: Pigment, Perception, and Rash Decisions

EM Ottawa

Skin conditions affect approximately one-third of the world’s population and are the 4th most common cause of disease.1,2. As the largest organ in the human body, the skin frequently manifests early signs of various diseases, serving as a pivotal clue in the diagnostic process. Think of Lyme disease as an example: when we recognize the […] The post Dermatology in Skin of Colour: Pigment, Perception, and Rash Decisions appeared first on EMOttawa Blog.

67
article thumbnail

Medical Music Mondays: Tick, Tick, Boom!

PEMBlog

Lyme disease has 3 stages. I have a hard time remembering them. Perhaps some pop punk will help? Learn about Early, Early disseminated, and Late Lyme. And remember, It’s Doxycycline Time! Lyrics [Chorus] Tick, Tick, Tick, Tick, BOOM! It’s Lyme! Doxycycline Time! Tick, Tick, Tick, Tick, BOOM! [Verse] Early disease is just one E M lesion Maybe one tick bite in the warm season Early disseminated is worse, I’ll confide this More rash, neuro stuff, and carditis Late disease joints r

article thumbnail

Be a mirror: Elevate experience and transform healthcare interactions

NRC Health

Healthcare leaders who understand that people need to feel validated, supported, and loved will have more meaningful healthcare interactions. The post Be a mirror: Elevate experience and transform healthcare interactions appeared first on NRC Health.

article thumbnail

Transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI): Review

PulmCCM

Transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI) is a form of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (PaO2/FiO2 <300) that develops during or soon after transfusion with blood products. It thus can also be thought of as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) precipitated by transfusion. The diagnosis of TRALI is clinical: there is no laboratory or other testing for TRALI (beyond a chest radiograph).

article thumbnail

Segmental cystectomy: what it is and what it is used for

Emergency Live

Surgical Solution for Bladder Cancer A commonly used surgical approach in this regard is represented by segmental cystectomy, which involves the removal of a portion of the bladder where cancer cells are present. This procedure is mainly performed for patients with low-grade bladder tumors concentrated in a very limited area of the bladder. Compared to […] The post Segmental cystectomy: what it is and what it is used for appeared first on Emergency Live.

75
article thumbnail

Early versus Later Anticoagulation for Stroke with Atrial Fibrillation

EM Ottawa

Methodology: 3/5 Usefulness: 2/5 Fischer U, et al. N Engl J Med. 2023 Jun 29;388(26):2411-2421. Question and Methods: RCT at 103 sites to compare outcomes at 30 days for early versus late DOAC initiation among patients with ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Findings: Primary outcome (ischemic stroke, systemic embolism, major bleeding, vascular death) occurred in […] The post Early versus Later Anticoagulation for Stroke with Atrial Fibrillation appeared first on EMOttawa Blog.

Stroke 52
article thumbnail

223. Hernias: incarcerated or strangled- would you rather?

Board Bombs

This episode we chat about common hernias and the 3 major scenarios you will encounter with them in the ED. We also offer you a game of would you rather. As usual, lots of highbrow conversation. Want to experience the greatest in board studying? Check out our interactive question bank podcast- the FIRST of its kind here. Cite this podcast as: Briggs, Blake; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena. 223.

52
article thumbnail

Network Five: LGBTQIA+ Identity & Healthcare.

Life in the Fast Lane

Pramod Chandru Network Five: LGBTQIA+ Identity & Healthcare. Network Five Emergency Medicine Journal Club Episode 29 reviewing papers on LGBTQIA+ identity and healthcare!

52
article thumbnail

Club CoreMed 2025: A New Oasis

Core Medical Group

Guess what? We've been keeping a secret, but the time has come to spill the beans! Club CoreMed 2025 has found its home at the brand new Margaritaville Island Reserve Resort Riviera Maya, saying goodbye to our beloved El Dorado venue after nine amazing years. Let's dive into the details.

59
article thumbnail

Understanding the Emergency Medical System in the United States

Emergency Live

The Complexity of the American Emergency Medical Services (EMS) System In the United States, the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) system is highly diversified and decentralized, designed to respond to a wide range of medical emergencies. The American EMS is a network coordinated by various entities; alongside emergency management organizations, there are also healthcare service providers […] The post Understanding the Emergency Medical System in the United States appeared first on Emergency

EMS 72
article thumbnail

EMCrit 375 – Vasopressors for Early Hemorrhage?

EMCrit

Today we talk about the debate over whether to give vasopressors as part of a balanced resuscitation in early exsanguination. EMCrit Project by Scott Weingart, MD FCCM.

article thumbnail

Andexanet vs prothrombin concentrate complex for intracranial hemorrhage (ANNEXA-I trial)

PulmCCM

A randomized trial shows that andexanet can stem the progression of intracranial hemorrhage better than 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate in patients taking factor Xa inhibitors. The clinical relevance is unclear, though, as patient-centered outcomes were not improved, and andexanet resulted in more serious thrombotic events than PCC. Factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban in the U.S.) are anticoagulants that have largely displaced warfarin for the prevention of stroke

Stroke 52
article thumbnail

Still using opioids for back pain?

Critical Care Now

Reading Time: 3 minutes Following a short break, this week we return to the always interesting topic of pain management and we are tackling a major issue in acute and chronic pain management – back pain. The study, titled “Opioid analgesia for acute low back pain and neck pain ( the OPAL trial ): a randomised placebo-controlled trial” by Jones et al, is a multicentric triple-blinded randomised controlled trial conducted in Sydney, Australia, across 157 research sites.

article thumbnail

CCN VLOG 1 – May 2024

Critical Care North Hampton

Here it is folks… the long-awaited first VLOG / Podcast from us here at CCN! Crunching all things critical care into one byte-sized session… added humour mandated!

52
article thumbnail

Sardinia Triumphs at DIU National Competition

Emergency Live

The event, held at the National Committee of the Italian Red Cross, saw over 140 students engage in discussions on humanitarian scenarios, with Sardinia clinching the top spot Over the weekend in Rome, the third edition of the National Humanitarian Law Competition took place, an event hosted by the National Committee of the Italian Red […] The post Sardinia Triumphs at DIU National Competition appeared first on Emergency Live.

67
article thumbnail

Thankful For Vaccine Fevers | Home remedies for Button Ingestions

JournalFeed

The JournalFeed podcast for the week of May 13-17, 2024. These are summaries from just 2 of the 5 articles we cover every week! For access to more, please visit JournalFeed.org for details about becoming a member. Wednesday Spoon Feed: Serious bacterial infections were exceedingly rare in this study of recently immunized infants 6-12 weeks presenting to the emergency department with a fever.

article thumbnail

Journal Feed Weekly Wrap-Up

EMDocs

We always work hard, but we may not have time to read through a bunch of journals. It’s time to learn smarter. Originally published at JournalFeed , a site that provides daily or weekly literature updates. Follow Dr. Clay Smith at @spoonfedEM , and sign up for email updates here. #1: Honey…or Jam for Button Battery Ingestion? Spoon Feed This pig cadaver study argues that jam is a reasonable alternative (if honey and sucralfate are unavailable) to give patients while awaiting definitive endoscopi