Fri.May 10, 2024

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NFTI And STAT: Can They Replace The Cribari Grid?

The Trauma Pro

In my last post, I reviewed using the Cribari grid to evaluate over- and under-triage at your trauma center. This technique has been a mainstay for nearly two decades but has shortcomings. The most important one is that it relies only on the Injury Severity Score (ISS) to judge whether some type of mistriage occurred. The ISS is usually calculated after discharge, so it can only be applied after the fact.

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If an ED doc sees cholecystitis on ultrasound, believe them

PulmCCM

Acute cholecystitis on ultrasound. Image by James Heilman, MD - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, [link] The diagnosis of cholecystitis can be made quickly and accurately in the emergency department using point-of-care ultrasound, according to a new meta-analysis. The authors analyzed 7 studies (n=1772) that tested point-of-care ultrasound performed by emergency physicians against the reference standard of final diagnosis (by discharge diagnosis, formal abdominal ultrasound by radiology, or surgical patho

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The Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Block

ACEP Now

Chronic knee pain is common and debilitating. Patients often seek care in the emergency department (ED) setting when flares of pain affect their ability to ambulate, climb stairs, or even stand up from sitting. 1 In many cases, these patients have been dealing with pain for years and have already exhausted the standard analgesic cocktail of acetaminophen, NSAIDs, and/or topical agents.

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Tattoos Still Won’t Boost Your Immune System

Science Based Medicine

Does the repeated stress on your immune system from getting tattoo after tattoo make you better able to fight off infections? No, no it does not. The post Tattoos Still Won’t Boost Your Immune System first appeared on Science-Based Medicine.

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Adenomas: what they are and how they can evolve

Emergency Live

An in-depth analysis on adenomas and their management in the European healthcare context What are adenomas? Adenomas are small non-cancerous growths that form in the gland cells. These benign tumors can appear in various parts of the body, such as the colon, thyroid, pituitary gland, and adrenal glands. While not cancerous, many adenomas require careful […] The post Adenomas: what they are and how they can evolve appeared first on Emergency Live.

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Grand Rounds Recap 5.1.24

Taming the SRU

Leadership curriculum - r4 capstone - r3 taming the sru - airway academy grand rounds - pharmacy updates Leadership curriculum: promoting yourself WITH drs. hill and lafollette We need to be able to promote our accomplishments throughout our careers. This is because our self-perception of ourselves typically differs from what others perceive of you and so you may not automatically get that promotion.

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It’s Your Call – May 2024

Total Medical ComplianceHIPAA

OSHA: Would OSHA inspect our office if a patient files a complaint about infection control? No. OSHA’s primary goal is to help employers and workers with compliance, reduce work hazards, and prevent injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace. A quick fact sheet about OSHA inspections can be found at [link]. HIPAA: What are the new reproductive rights afforded by HIPAA?

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Innovation and Safety: The Key Components of Ambulance Stretchers

Emergency Live

Discover the essential features of ambulance stretchers, pillars of emergency medicine How are stretchers constructed and what are they made of? Stretchers used in ambulances are designed to keep patients safe and easy to move. They are mostly made of lightweight metals like aluminum. This combination of strength and reduced weight is crucial for easily […] The post Innovation and Safety: The Key Components of Ambulance Stretchers appeared first on Emergency Live.

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Cifu, Mandrola, Prasad

Sensible Medicine

Masking, Justice, Harvard med stud video, causal language

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Chest Pain in Children: ReBaked Morsel

Pediatric EM Morsels

Children like to pretend to be grown-ups. Unfortunately, sometimes they develop grown-up problems ( Cholelithiasis , Kidney Stones , and Hypertension ). Additionally, often kids will complain of symptoms that warrant great concern in adults, but often engender apathy when considered in children. Chest Pain in Children is a great example of one of these complaints.

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Extracting External Auditory Canal Foreign Bodies

ACEP Now

The best questions often stem from the inquisitive learner. As educators, we love—and are always humbled—by those moments when we get to say “I don’t know.” For some of these questions, you may already know the answers. For others, you may never have thought to ask the question. For all, questions, comments, concerns, and critiques are encouraged. Welcome to the Kids Korner.

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Evidence based medicine. 6 months a year

Sensible Medicine

I joke that Chicago is the best city in the world…… six months a year. It's true. Chicago is brilliant in the late spring, summer and fall. Now my own institution moves towards being evidence based…… six months a year. After 4 years, our mask mandate ended May 2, 2024. My patients and I are finally (officially) mask free. But mask mandates will return.

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Diagnosing Lower Urinary Tract Infections

ACEP Now

Few shifts go by without ordering at least one urinalysis. While they are ubiquitously used, urine testing is often unneeded and frequently misleading. How often do you feel frustrated about a urine sample that takes too long to obtain? You may not need the sample in the first place. To understand why, we need to go back to the basics and think carefully about the indications for obtaining a urinalysis.

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Tips for Diagnosing Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another

ACEP Now

A 9-month-old male presents to emergency department (ED) with his mother for seizure. The child was diagnosed with seizure disorder at 2 months of age and has had multiple visits to the emergency department (ED) for seizures. The child was delivered at term vaginally, with normal prenatal period and labor. Immunizations are up to date. The child drinks baby formula and has been advancing his diet using baby food.