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Young man with Gunshot wound to right chest with hemorrhagic shock, but bullet path not near heart

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

A young man presented with a gunshot wound to the right chest, with hemo-pneumothorax and hemorrhagic shock. But he did get an EKG: What is this? Figure-1: The ECG sent to Ken Grauer ( showing some semblance of "group" beating ). He got a chest tube and intubation and massive transfusion and stabilized. Formal echo was normal.

Shock 105
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ACMT Toxicology Visual Pearl: Salt, not Shock

ALiEM

What agent would most likely be responsible for these ECG findings? This EKG shows a wide complex (QRS 240 msec), irregular rhythm with left bundle branch block morphology at a rate slower than expected (90 bpm) for a ventricular arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia. Cyclobenzaprine Digoxin Flecainide Sotalol Reveal the Answer 3.

Shock 70
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ECG Blog #400 — Is this a NSTEMI?

Ken Grauer, MD

The ECG in Figure-1 is from an older man with known coronary disease — who presents to the ED ( E mergency D epartment ) with new CP ( C hest P ain ) over the past several days. QUESTIONS: In view of this history — How would you interpret the ECG in Figure-1 ? Figure-1: The initial ECG in today's case. Troponin is pending.

EKG/ECG 237
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ECG Blog #386 — OMI or Something Else?

Ken Grauer, MD

The ECG in Figure-1 was obtained from a previously healthy middle-aged man — who while performing his regular exercise routine, developed "slight" chest discomfort and "palpitations". Surprisingly — he was hemodynamically stable with minimal discomfort at the time his initial ECG in Figure-1 was recorded. Could the patient have WPW?

EKG/ECG 195
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How will you save this critically ill patient? A fundamental and lifesaving ECG interpretation that everyone must recognize instantly.

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

An ECG was performed: What do you think? It is unclear what changes happened to the rhythm based on the EMS interventions, but the patient arrived to the ED remaining critically ill and with a very wide complex reported (no ECGs from ED available sadly). Here is her ECG the next day with normal potassium level: She did well.

EKG/ECG 128
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ECG Blog #366 — Diltiazem didn't work.

Ken Grauer, MD

The ECG and long lead II rhythm strip in Figure-1 — was obtained from a COVID positive patient with persistent tachycardia not responding to Diltiazem. Figure-1: The initial ECG — obtained from a patient with persistent tachycardia. ( To improve visualization — I've digitized the original ECG using PMcardio ).

EKG/ECG 195
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Chest pain and shock: Is there a right ventricular OMI on this ECG? And should he undergo trancutaneous pacing?

Dr. Smith's ECG Blog

A 50-something man presented in shock with severe chest pain. His prehospital ECG was diagnostic of inferior posterior OMI. The patient was in clinical shock with a lactate of 8. Here is his ED ECG: There is bradycardia with a junctional escape. RVMI explains part of the shock. What is the atrial activity?

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